An analysis of the theme of holocaust in spiegelmans maus and maus ii

Prologue Artie Spiegelman, a young Jewish-American cartoonist, arrives for a visit at the home of his father, Vladek, after a long estrangement.

An analysis of the theme of holocaust in spiegelmans maus and maus ii

The commentary should disrupt the facile linear progression of the narration, introduce alternative interpretations, question any partial conclusion, withstand the need for closure [ Leventhal Copyright c by Robert S. Leventhal, all rights reserved.

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Maus Summary from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

Trauma, Working-Through, and the Problem of Historical Understanding One of the most significant attempts to understand the response to the Shoah is through the texts and terms of Freudian Psychoanalysis.

In his decisive essay ofMourning and Melancholiareferred to many times in this archive, Freud distinguishes between two fundamentally distinct modalities of moving through the trauamatic loss of a beloved object.

In mourning, the subject grieves for the loss of the beloved, and gradually comes to terms with that loss through the sustained reflection regarding the multiple meanings of that loss. Mourning is characterized by an initial withdrawl from the external world of things and events, and centers upon the subject's feeling of the loss of a significant aspect of one's life.

In melancholia, however, there has usually been a highly ambivalent relation to the beloved object, and the subject becomes isolated, depressed, and experiences this loss of the Other as the loss of him or herself.

The melancholic reaction to the traumatic loss of a beloved is characterized by extreme self-devaluation, to the extent that the subject might actually believe that he or she is responsible for the death or departure of the Other, that he or she is a "murderer" him or herself responsible for the "killing off" of the Other.

Or, conversely, the subject views him or herself as the abandoned object, having been "left" by the dead Other, and might view him or herself as a victim, as the wounded or hurt recipient of this traumatic loss that the Other has "imposed.

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Winicott's famous phrase "Mourning without empathy leads to madness" has often been cited as the key to his theory, which is that there must be an empathetic witness to the pain of this traumatic loss, that the person who suffers this loss must be able to give testimony to someone as a way of working-through or processing this loss, and that finally certain "transitional" or "intermediate" objects might be necessary in order to move from the state of dependence and reliance on the Other to a renewed state of self-sufficiency after the traumatic severance.

The difficulty with this type of understanding is its insistence on a singular empathetic Other who hears the testimony of the witness, and thereby bears witness to the traumatic loss in a therapeutic manner. What does it actually mean to "work-through" a traumatic loss?

Many of the normative claims of psychoanalysis are present in this type of approach: This is the thesis of Eric Santner's Stranded Objects. The Postmodern Melancholia In much of what has been written about the Holocaust in recent years, one can notice a tendency to discuss the Holocaust and the responses to it in terms borrowed from the description of Melancholia.

An analysis of the theme of holocaust in spiegelmans maus and maus ii

One of the most obvious instances of this can be seen in Lyotard's connection of Auschwitz and the unrepresentable in The Differend. Here, the sublime, which since Kant has been the singular individual's struggle of the Idea in the face of overwelming experiences, is utilized to characterize the sense of the Shoah: Auschwitz becomes a limit that defies phrasing.

This is also present in the work of Cathy Caruth, "Unclaimed Experience: Trauma here is not merely seen in the Benjaminian sense of the condition of history and historicity, but that History itself becomes viewed as traumatic.

Cornell,this conflation of history with trauma might itself be the uncritical result and symptom of posttraumatic, unworked through identifications and investments. An example of what LaCapra is hinting at might also be the work of George Steinerin which Auschwitz signifies an irrevocable loss of language, and the German language in particular.

For LaCapra, one of the great challenges of postmodern and poststructuralist readings of the trauma inflicted by the Shoah would be to reflect on the ways in which they themselves participate in a melancholic reaction to the event. The Canon and Canonical Texts One of the ways in which a culture betrays in the sense of "allows to become clear" its own "investments" or Besetzungen, to use Freud's term for the psychic endowment of certain things, is in its priveleging specific ways of thinking and writing, certain forms of presentation, the selection of specific genres as being "apt" or "appropriate" for certain tasks.

Art Spiegelman's MAUS

An analysis of Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List could show that the primacy of the visual romance in some way governs the institution of filming in that film.

As Primo Levi sought to articulate the discursive and logistical space of Auschwitz, Syberberg attempts to actually enter into the distorted puppet-show of German Fascism, the "black studio" of German film projections and fantasies, the nostalgiac, melancholic state of Postwar, Postholocaust Germany.

Lanzmann's Shoah equally does away with conventional narrative schemes and totalizing representation, presenting the Nazi Genocide in a series of detailed "researches" or "inquiries," and utilizing not a single foot of documentary film from the thirties or forties.

Lanzmann's film allows the contradictions between the testimony of the perpetrators and that of the victims to stand.

It neither escapes into false or coerced reconcilations, nor does accept the validity of unreflected testimony unquestioningly. The way in which a culture organizes, "disciplines," and reads a certain event is an excellent way to find out about that culture's "troubled areas" or "hot spots.Note: Maus jumps back and forth often between the past and the present.

To facilitate these transitions in this summary, the Holocaust narrative is written in normal font, while all other narratives are written in italics.

The story begins with a brief prologue, set in Rego Park (Queens), NY, in. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Maus, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Art Spiegelman, the author and narrator of Maus, is the child of two Polish Holocaust survivors: Vladek, his father, and Anja, his mother. Racism is a theme that echos throughout Maus. The Nazi's purpose was to exterminate the Jews because they believed them to be sub-human.

With a story that was centered around the Holocaust it would be difficult to avoid the topic. In much of what has been written about the Holocaust in recent years, one can notice a tendency to discuss the Holocaust and the responses to it in terms borrowed from the description of Melancholia.

An analysis of Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List could show that the primacy of the (visual) Volumes I and II of the book Maus: A.

Note: Maus jumps back and forth often between the past and the present. To facilitate these transitions in this summary, the Holocaust narrative is written in normal font, while all . Through closure, Maus attempts to create a functional history of the Holocaust through its readership.

Nevertheless, Spiegelman forces readers to take a step backward, criticizing the notion that one can wholly understand a large scale atrocity such as the Holocaust without having actually been there to experience it first-hand.

An analysis of the theme of holocaust in spiegelmans maus and maus ii